Table of Contents

The immune systems of humans and non-human primates have diverged such that these animals show inter- and intra-species variation in susceptibility, symptoms, and survival of particular infectious diseases. Variation in primate immunity is such that some major human pathogens-- such as immunodeficiency viruses, herpesviruses and malaria-inducing species of Plasmodium-- elicit striking differences in immune response between closely related species and within populations. Complex evolutionary processes that include interactions among the host, its pathogens and symbiont/commensal organisms have shaped these differences in immunity. The success of some pathogens in establishing persistent infections in humans and other primates has been determined not just by the molecular evolution of the pathogen and its interactions with the host, but also by the evolution of primate behavior and ecology, microflora, immune factors and the evolution of other biological systems. To explore how interactions between primates and their pathogens have shaped their mutual molecular evolution, Primates, Pathogens and Evolution brings together research that explores comparative primate immune function, the emergence of major and neglected primate diseases, primate-microorganism molecular interactions, and related topics.