Table of Contents

The Jinn in the genome.
2B or not 2B?.
Stephen Mobley and his X-chromosome.
Dial Multifactorial for Murder: The intersection of genes and culture.
Distorted capacity: The measure of the impaired will.
Distorted capacity: Neuropsychiatric diseases and the impaired will.
Inheritance of Behavior and Genes "For" Behavior Gene Wars.
The scientific and historic bases of genethics: Who watches the geneticists and by what principles?.
The world is double helical DNA, RNA and proteins, in a few easy pieces.
The stochastic brain: From DNA blueprint to behavior.
Reintroducing genes and behavior.
Warriors and Worriers.
How many genes does it take to make a behavior?.
The genesis and genetics of sexual behavior.
Gene x environment interaction.
The epigenetic revolution: Finding the imprint of the environment on the genome.
DNA on Trial.
Parents and children: Neurogenetic determinism and Neurogenetic individuality.
Summing up genetic predictors of behavior. Are people free to make choices, or do genes determine behavior? Paradoxically, the answer to both questions is "yes," because of neurogenetic individuality, a new theory with profound implications. This theory emerged from gene discoveries by Dr. Goldman and his colleagues which have been recently published in 'Nature'. Genetic studies reveal pathways from DNA to behavior that are helping us understand the diversity of human behavior and behavior of other species. In this book, the complexity of human behavior and a person's ability to choose is explained as deriving from a relatively small number of genes which direct neurodevelopmental sequence. The author uses judicial, political, medical, and ethical examples to illustrate that this lifelong process is guided by individual genotype, molecular and physiologic principles, as well as by randomness and environmental exposures we choose and do not choose. Poses and resolves challenges to moral responsibility raised by modern genetics and neuroscience Preface will be written by a world renowned geneticist or neuroscientist. Authoritatively written, provides a neurogenetic mechanism for the origins of free will and ability to make moral choices to engage a broad audience of professionals.
Are people free to make choices, or do genes determine behavior? Paradoxically, the answer to both questions is "yes," because of neurogenetic individuality, a new theory with profound implications. This theory emerged from gene discoveries by Dr. Goldman and his colleagues which have been recently published in 'Nature'. Genetic studies reveal pathways from DNA to behavior that are helping us understand the diversity of human behavior and behavior of other species. In this book, the complexity of human behavior and a person's ability to choose is explained as deriving from a relatively small number of genes which direct neurodevelopmental sequence. The author uses judicial, political, medical, and ethical examples to illustrate that this lifelong process is guided by individual genotype, molecular and physiologic principles, as well as by randomness and environmental exposures we choose and do not choose. Poses and resolves challenges to moral responsibility raised by modern genetics and neuroscience Preface will be written by a world renowned geneticist or neuroscientist. Authoritatively written, provides a neurogenetic mechanism for the origins of free will and ability to make moral choices to engage a broad audience of professionals.