Table of Contents

The first observation of cold-induced precipitation of serum proteins dates back to 1933, when Wintrobe and Buell first described an unusual case of multiple myeloma in a woman whose serum reversibly precipitated at cold temperatures. In 1947, Lerner and Watson showed cold-precipitable proteins to be gammaglobulins and called them 'cryoglobulins' and the corresponding clinical condition 'cryoglobulinemia'. Meltzer and Franklin in 1966 provided an accurate description of the typical clinical symptoms associated with cryoglobulinemia, showed that they consisted of two different globulin componen
The first observation of cold-induced precipitation of serum proteins dates back to 1933, when Wintrobe and Buell first described an unusual case of multiple myeloma in a woman whose serum reversibly precipitated at cold temperatures. In 1947, Lerner and Watson showed cold-precipitable proteins to be gammaglobulins and called them 'cryoglobulins' and the corresponding clinical condition 'cryoglobulinemia'. Meltzer and Franklin in 1966 provided an accurate description of the typical clinical symptoms associated with cryoglobulinemia, showed that they consisted of two different globulin componen