Table of Contents

Cover.
Forensic Mental Health Assessment.
Copyright.
Contents.
Preface.
About the Editors.
Contributors.
Forensic Mental Health Assessment.
1 Introduction and Overview.
Deriving Principles of Forensic Mental Health Assessment.
The Principles of Forensic Mental Health Assessment.
The Need for a Revised Casebook.
Applying Principles to FMHA Cases.
Cautions in Using Case Material.
How to Use This Book.
2 Miranda Waiver Capacity.
CASE ONE Principle: Use nomothetic ­evidence in assessing clinical condition, functional abilities, and causal connection (Principle 28).
Teaching Point: What is the value of specialized forensic assessment instruments in forensic mental health assessment?.
CASE TWO Principle: Use case-specific (idiographic) evidence in assessing clinical condition, functional abilities, and causal Connection.
Teaching Point: What are the limits of specialized forensic assessment instruments?.
3 Competence to Stand Trial.
CASE ONE Principle: Use testing when indicated in assessing response style (Principle 26).
Teaching Point: Integrating Different Sources of Response Style Data.
CASE TWO Principle: Select the most appropriate model to guide in data gathering, interpretation, and communication (Principle 16).
Teaching Point: How can you use a model to structure the way you write the report?.
CASE THREE Principle: Attribute information to sources (Principle 32).
Teaching Point: Separating and integrating data from different sources through source attribution in analyzing, reasoning about and communicating FMHA results.
4 Criminal Responsibility.
CASE ONE Principle: Be familiar with the relevant legal, ethical, scientific, and practice literatures pertaining to FMHA (Principle 3).
Teaching Point: Sources of particularly relevant information from the literature. 14 Harassment and Discrimination.
CASE ONE Principle: Do not become adversarial, but present and defend your opinions effectively (Principle 7).
Teaching Point: Communicating firmly but fairly.
Teaching Point: The value of sequential communication of FMHA results.
15 Workplace Disability.
CASE ONE Principle: Assess legally relevant behavior (Principle 21).
Teaching Point: The relationship between symptoms and disability in capacity to work.
CASE TWO Principle: Assess clinical characteristics in relevant, reliable, and valid ways (Principle 20).
Teaching Point: Useful approaches to assessing clinical characteristics in FMHA.
16 Guardianship.
CASE ONE Principle: Be aware of the important differences between clinical and forensic domains (Principle 1).
Teaching Point: Guardianship and the revised Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology.
17 Child Custody.
CASE ONE Principle: Determine the particular role to be played if the referral is accepted (Principle 15).
Teaching Point: Can one ever play more than one role in a single FMHA case?.
CASE TWO Principle: Use multiple sources of information for each area being assessed (Principle 17).
Teaching Point: The role of the forensic clinician in collecting third party information.
18 Child Protection.
CASE ONE Principle: Assess legally relevant behavior (Principle 21).
Teaching Point: Identifying forensic capacities when the legal standard is vague or unelaborated.
CASE TWO Principle: Be guided by honesty and striving for impartiality, actively disclosing the limitations on, as well as the support for, one's opinions (Principle 4).
Teaching Point: Specific strategies for promoting impartiality in a particular evaluation.
Teaching Point: Mental health professionals' role in assisting the court in determining the veracity of allegations of child sexual abuse. 19 Juvenile Miranda Waiver Capacity.
CASE ONE Principle: Use nomothetic evidence in assessing causal connection between clinical condition and functional abilities.
Teaching Point: Applying group-based evidence supporting a specialized forensic assessment measure in a single case.
CASE TWO Principle: Do not become adversarial, but present and defend your opinions effectively (Principle 7).
Teaching Point: Whether and how to criticize material from the records.
20 Juvenile Competence to Stand Trial.
CASE ONE Principle: Use relevance and reliability (validity) as guides for seeking information and selecting data sources (Principle 18).
Teaching Point: Selecting a specialized measure on juvenile competence to stand trial.
CASE TWO Principle: Ensure that conditions for evaluation are quiet, private, and distraction-free (Principle 22).
Teaching Point: Identifying and implementing strategies for improving inadequate conditions.
21 Juvenile Commitment.
CASE ONE Principle: Accept referrals only within area of expertise (Principle 9).
Teaching Point: What training and experience in forensic, developmental, and mental health areas are needed for juvenile forensic expertise.
CASE TWO Principle: Provide appropriate notification of purpose and obtain appropriate authorization before beginning (Principle 23).
Teaching Point: Obtaining authorization for evaluating minors who cannot yet legally consent.
22 Juvenile Transfer and Decertification.
CASE ONE Principle: Assess legally relevant behavior (Principle 21).
Teaching Point: Translating legal criteria into forensic capacities.
CASE TWO Principle: Use third party information in assessing response style (Principle 25).
Teaching Point: Addressing conflicting information from the interview, testing, and third party sources.
23 Military. CASE TWO Principle: Attribute information to sources (Principle 32).
Teaching Point: Line-by-line versus paragraph-level attribution (contributed by Daniel Murrie).
CASE THREE Principle: Decline the referral when evaluator impartiality is unlikely (Principle 10).
Teaching Point: Remaining impartial in high visibility cases.
5 Sexual Offending Risk Evaluation.
CASE ONE Principle: Provide appropriate notification of purpose and obtain appropriate authorization before beginning (Principle 23).
Teaching Point: Obtaining informed consent in sexually violent predator cases.
6 Federal Sentencing.
CASE ONE Principle: Describe findings so that they need change little under cross-examination (Principle 31).
Teaching Point: Communicating findings to accurately reflect their strength and the evaluator's confidence in them.
CASE TWO Principle: Use scientific reasoning in assessing the causal connection between clinical condition and functional abilities.
Teaching Point: Risk-need assessment in sentencing.
7 Capital Sentencing.
CASE ONE Principle: Use multiple sources of information for each area being assessed. Review the available background information and actively seek important missing elements (Principle 17).
Teaching Point: How much is enough? Diminishing returns from information sources.
CASE TWO Principle: Obtain relevant historical information (Principle 19).
Teaching Point: Evaluating the accuracy of different sources of third party information.
8 Capital Sentencing, Atkins-Type Evaluations.
CASE ONE Principle: Accept referrals only within area of expertise (Principle 9).
Teaching Point: Gauging the training and experience in forensic and mental health areas needed for this kind of evaluation. CASE TWO Principle: Use relevance and reliability (validity) as guides for seeking information and selecting data sources (Principle 18).
Teaching Point: Selecting tools for use in FMHA.
9 Competence for Execution.
CASE ONE Principle: Identify relevant forensic issues (Principle 8).
Teaching Point: Identify assessment targets when legal standards are broad or non-specific.
10 Competence to Consent to Treatment.
CASE ONE Principle: Use third party information in assessing response style (Principle 25).
Teaching Point: Balancing results from interview, testing, and third party sources as they relate to response style.
Teaching Point: Communicating complex scientific material to legal professionals and lay audiences.
11 Testamentary Capacity.
CASE ONE Principle: Determine whether the individual understands the purpose of the evaluation and associated limits on confidentiality (Principle 24).
Teaching Point: Advantages of written versus spoken notification in determining whether the notification is understood.
12 Personal Injury.
CASE ONE Principle: Carefully consider whether to answer the ultimate legal question. If answered, it should be in the context of a thorough evaluation clearly describing data and reasoning, and with the clear recognition that this question is in the domain of the legal decision maker (Principle 30).
Teaching Point: Answering the ultimate legal question directly.
CASE TWO Principle: Decline the referral when evaluator impartiality is unlikely (Principle 10).
Teaching Point: Declining the case when impartiality would be too difficult.
13 Civil Commitment.
CASE ONE Principle: Use relevance and reliability (validity) as guides for seeking information and selecting data sources (Principle 18).
Teaching Point: The strengths and weaknesses of classification systems. Forensic mental health assessment (FMHA) continues to develop and expand as a specialization. Since the publication of the First Edition of Forensic Mental Health Assessment: A Casebook over a decade ago, there have been a number of significant changes in the applicable law, ethics, science, and practice that have shaped the conceptual and empirical underpinnings of FMHA. The Second Edition of Forensic Mental Health Assessment is thoroughly updated in light of the developments and changes in the field, while still keeping the unique structure of presenting cases, detailed reports, and specific.