Table of Contents

Front Matter.
An Overview of Biorefinery Technology / Mahmoud A Sharara, Edgar C Clausen, Danielle Julie Carrier.
Overview of the Chemistry of Primary and Secondary Plant Metabolites / Chantal Bergeron.
Separation and Purification of Phytochemicals as Co-Products in Biorefineries / Hua-Jiang Huang, Shri Ramaswamy.
Phytochemicals from Corn: a Processing Perspective / Kent Rausch.
Co-Products from Cereal and Oilseed Biorefinery Systems / Nurhan Turgut Dunford.
Bioactive Soy Co-Products / Arvind Kannan, Srinivas Rayaprolu, Navam Hettiarachchy.
Production of Valuable Compounds by Supercritical Technology Using Residues from Sugarcane Processing / Juliana M Prado, M Angela A Meireles.
Potential Value-Added Co-products from Citrus Fruit Processing / John A Manthey.
Recovery of Leaf Protein for Animal Feed and High-Value Uses / Bryan D Bals, Bruce E Dale, Venkatesh Balan.
Phytochemicals from Algae / Liam Brennan, Anika Mostaert, Cormac Murphy, Philip Owende.
New Bioactive Natural Products from Canadian Boreal Forest / Fraṅois Simard, Andř Pichette, Jean Legault.
Pressurized Fluid Extraction and Analysis of Bioactive Compounds in Birch Bark / Michelle Co, Charlotta Turner.
Adding Value to the Integrated Forest Biorefinery with Co-Products from Hemicellulose-Rich Pre-Pulping Extract / Abigail S Engelberth, G Peter van Walsum.
Pyrolysis Bio-Oils from Temperate Forests: Fuels, Phytochemicals and Bioproducts / Mamdouh Abou-zaid, Ian M Scott.
Char from Sugarcane Bagasse / K Thomas Klasson.
Index. In order to successfully compete as a sustainable energy source, the value of biomass must be maximized through the production of valuable co-products in the biorefinery. Specialty chemicals and other biobased products can be extracted from biomass prior to or after the conversion process, thus increasing the overall profitability and sustainability of the biorefinery. Biorefinery Co-Products highlights various co-products that are present in biomass prior to and after processing, describes strategies for their extraction, and presents examples of bioenergy feedstocks that contain high value.
In order to successfully compete as a sustainable energy source, the value of biomass must be maximized through the production of valuable co-products in the biorefinery. Specialty chemicals and other biobased products can be extracted from biomass prior to or after the conversion process, thus increasing the overall profitability and sustainability of the biorefinery. Biorefinery Co-Products highlights various co-products that are present in biomass prior to and after processing, describes strategies for their extraction, and presents examples of bioenergy feedstocks that contain high value.
Bergeron., Chantal;Carrier, Danielle Julie;Ramaswamy, Shri
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John Wiley & Sons
2012
9780470975596
9780470973578
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